Wednesday, November 19, 2014

SEEKING STUDENTS FOR PHD IN INQUIRY METHODOLOGY



SEEKING STUDENTS FOR PHD IN INQUIRY METHODOLOGY

The Inquiry Methodology doctoral program, housed in the Indiana University School of Education, now offers a PhD in Inquiry Methodology (also referred to as Research Methodology) with three possible areas of focus.

Doctoral students in Inquiry Methodology receive rigorous training in one of three research methodology areas: qualitative inquiry, quantitative inquiry, or an integrated track. Graduates of research methodology programs are in high demand and enjoy a number of job opportunities, including academia, research institutes, government, and the commercial sector.

Possible areas of focus include educational and social science statistics, psychometrics, evaluation, ethnography, discourse analysis and so forth. In a climate that heavily emphasizes scientifically based research supported by sound methods, Inquiry Methodology students will be well positioned to secure research positions in any number of areas such as education, psychology or other social sciences, both applied and theoretical.

To learn more about this program, including how to apply for admission and funding, please visit our website: http://education.indiana.edu/graduate/programs/inquiry-methodology/

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Need Resume or Cover Letter Help?



Dear Psychology and Neuroscience majors,

This week is National Career Development Week! Tomorrow, Thursday, November 13th from 1-4PM, Mo Issa from the Career Development Center will have a booth in the Jordan Hall Atrium where students can have their resumes reviewed, schedule appointments for resume/cover letter critiques, answer career related trivia questions (and win candy), and ask questions and learn about the CDC/ASCS services. We encourage you to take advantage of this valuable professional development opportunity!

If you have any questions, you can reach Mo directly at mnissa@indiana.edu.  
PBS Advising Team

Friday, October 10, 2014

Counseling Psychology Student Organization's mentoring program



This semester, the Counseling Psychology Student Organization (CPSO) is offering a mentoring program for prospective students who may be interested in applying for the counseling/counselor education master's program and/or the counseling psychology doctoral program through the School of Education at IUB. Having been through the application process themselves, the current graduate students in the organization understand how it can be stressful along the way. They hope that by reaching out and offering support to prospective students, it will make the process less tedious and more enjoyable.

If you are interested in receiving one-on-one mentoring, please fill out this survey:  http://tinyurl.com/pz72vta

In the survey, you may indicate areas of interest and special requests that you may have regarding mentorship. Although they cannot guarantee an exact match based on interests, they will do their best to accommodate you. Should you have questions or comments, feel free to email the program coordinator, Lei Wang, at lw55@indiana.edu .

Three fellowships offered by The Marcus Autism Center



The Marcus Autism Center, in conjunction with the Emory University School of Medicine and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, is offering three fellowships: the Simons Fellowship in Computational Neuroscience, the Simons Fellowship in Design Engineering, and the Cohen Fellowship in Developmental Social Neuroscience. Attached, please find a brochure describing the fellowships. I ask that you let us know that you have received this e-mail and that you forward it, along with the associated brochure, to students in Indiana University's Department of Pyschological and Brain Sciences.

Students who will receive a bachelor’s degree by June 2015 will be eligible for the positions. The fellowships will commence in July 2015, and they are 2 years in duration. Students can find further details at: cohenfellowship.org and simonsfellowship.org.

The training experience for the Cohen Fellowship in Developmental Social Neuroscience will primarily involve daily activities related to eye-tracking research, including operation of experimental equipment and paradigms, contact with infants and toddlers and their families, and responsibility for completing experimental protocols.

The training experience for the Simons Fellowship in Computational Neuroscience will involve developing methods for the analysis of visual scanning and eye-tracking data, computational models of visual salience, and data visualization techniques, all with the aim of advancing the understanding of autism and efforts at early diagnosis.

The training experience for the Simons Fellowship in Design Engineering will involve developing innovative design solutions to answer experimental research questions. These solutions offer an opportunity to explore human factors engineering, product prototyping, and the design of environments for neuroscience research.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Undergraduate Career & Professional Development Round Tables - Sign Up Today!



Dear Psychology and Neuroscience Majors,
On Friday October 17th, the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences will celebrate its 2nd Annual Alumni Recognition and Homecoming Day. You are invited to join us at 11:30am on Friday, for Undergraduate Career & Professional Development Round Tables with alumni and professionals in the fields of business, criminology & law, social work/clinical, and career/graduate school planning. Representatives in each of these areas will address questions you might have about these career paths as they relate to psychology and neuroscience. We hope you will attend one of these round tables and tap into the experience of thriving professionals in each field. More details about each round table can be found here:
BUSINESS
George F. Dreher (Ph.D), Professor Emeritus, Management and Entrepreneurship, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University-Bloomington, will lead a round table discussion open to all students interested in pursuing careers in business, human resources or other areas related to psychology, including industrial/organizational psychology. Through an informal discussion and question and answer session, students will learn about post-graduate opportunities available in the business world.
Professor Dreher previously was an industrial psychologist at Southern California Edison Company, a member of the faculty at the University of Kansas, and served as a visiting scholar at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Professor Dreher’s research focuses on the role of race, ethnicity, gender, and opportunity in accounting for career attainment and success in multinational enterprises (with a focus on managerial and executive talent pool management).  He has published widely in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, the Academy of Management Review, the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, the Journal of Management, Human Relations, and the Journal of Vocational Psychology. He also has co-authored three books and numerous other papers and book chapters.
CRIMINOLOGY & LAW
Have you thought about going to law school or pursuing a career in the legal or civil service sector? Psychological and Brain Sciences alumna Jessica Jackson-McLain, faculty member Dr. Mary C. Murphy, and Associate Professor of Law Victor D. Quintanilla will lead a round table discussion designed for students interested in legal or civil service professions. Through an informal question and answer session, the discussion will focus on the intersection between psychology and the law and help students to better understand possible routes towards these career goals. Specifically, students will learn more about career and graduate school options that incorporate psychology and law and the ways in which student interested in law might benefit (and benefit their employers) from a deeper understanding of psychological theories and research.
Jessica Jackson-McLain is a first-generation college student and a recent graduate of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. She graduated summa cum laude from Indiana University in 2010 with a double-major in psychology and criminal justice and a minor in political science. During law school, she served as the Secretary General of Maurer's ACS chapter and competed in the Sherman Minton and Williams Institute Moot Court Competitions. Her first law-school summer, she interned in Washington, DC, with both the Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Inspector General, and the Department of Commerce, Office of General Counsel. The following summer she was a judicial extern for the Honorable Christopher A. Nuechterlein, Magistrate Judge of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana.
Mary C. Murphy is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Indiana University. Her research focuses on developing and testing theories about how people’s social identities and group memberships, such as their gender, race, and socio-economic status, interact with the contexts they encounter to affect people’s thoughts, feelings, motivation, and performance. Her specific research projects focus on illuminating the situational cues that influence students’ academic motivation and achievement with an emphasis on understanding when those processes are similar and different for majority students and underrepresented minority students. Dr. Murphy has conducted research at the intersection of social psychology and law that examines how stigmatized groups (e.g., gay individuals, people of color) are treated and perceived in the context of certain laws and legal practices. Dr. Murphy earned a B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin and a PhD from Stanford University. After graduate school, she completed a NSF postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University, followed by an Assistant Professor position at the University of Illinois at Chicago. In 2012, she joined the faculty of Indiana University in Bloomington, IN.
Victor D. Quintanilla joined the Maurer School of Law faculty in 2012. His research evaluates legal decision-making and jurisprudence by drawing on theory and methods within the field of social psychology.  He examines how social psychological accounts of human behavior compare and contrast with assumptions about human behavior embedded within the law.  His current empirical projects involve several phenomena, including procedural justice, implicit bias, lay theories of discrimination, and implicit theories of jurisprudence, and explore issues of race, gender, and discrimination.  At Indiana Law, he teaches Civil Procedure I and will teach Advanced Civil Procedure, and Law and Social Psychology.  Quintanilla has presented his research at several academic conferences, including the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), and the Law & Society Association (LSA).  Before joining the law school, Quintanilla served as a trial attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, an associate of Sidley Austin LLP, a staff law clerk for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and a law clerk to the Honorable Peter J. Messitte of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland.
SOCIAL WORK/CLINICAL
Psychological and Brain Sciences alumnus Keaton Presti-Stringfellow and Melissa N. Ritter, Education Technology Specialist for PBS, will lead a round table discussion open to all students interested in social work or other related counseling areas. Students will learn more about post-graduate opportunities available to psychology majors with an interest in the field of social work. This informal question and answer session will explore topics pertinent to the field such as case management, school psychology, and family and community services.
Keaton Presti-Stringfellow is currently a second year student in the MSW program at IUPUI with a mental health concentration.
Melissa N. Ritter, MSW, LSW is currently employed by the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences as their Education Technology Specialist for the past 2 years.  She earned her Bachelors of Science in Psychology with a minor in Gender Studies from Indiana University in 2008 during which time she was a member of Psi Chi, the National Psychology Honors Society.  From there, she worked full time as a mental health technician at Bloomington Meadows Hospital until 2010.  She received her Master of Social Work from the University of Kentucky in 2012 during which she was able to work on a number of research projects focusing on chronic health conditions, poverty, child abuse and neglect, and asset based community assessments and presented this work at conferences, including the 2012 and 2013 Community Development Society’s Annual Conference and the 2012 Kentucky Association of Social Work Education (KASWE) Conference.  Aside from her program evaluation and research experiences, Melissa also completed two full-time internships at the Children’s Advocacy Center of the Bluegrass and the UK Center on Trauma and Children. 
GRADUATE SCHOOL PLANNING FOR CAREERS IN MENTAL HEALTH
Want to learn more about what LMHC, LPC, MSW, MFT, PsyD, and PhD mean? Join Alison Smith, Assistant Director at the IU Career Development Center, for a round table discussion focusing on the different career and graduate school options available in the mental health counseling field. This session is designed for students who are interested in getting started in the graduate school planning process and have questions related to reaching career goals in the field of Psychology - we hope that you can join us to get the conversation started!

Alison Smith currently serves as Assistant Director at the IU Career Development Center. Alison’s passion for career development was discovered during her undergraduate education while she worked as a peer advisor for the Career Development Center at the University of Richmond. After graduation, she moved to Chicago and took a job as a recruiter. Missing the higher education environment, she accepted a position at the University of Chicago in Dual Career Services. In her role, she assisted the spouses and partners of new faculty members and faculty recruits. Alison is excited to be back working with students and helping them discover their career goals. Students enrolled in degree programs within the Natural & Mathematical Sciences division can schedule an appointment with Alison to receive career-related assistance. Visit ascs.indiana.edu and schedule an appointment with Alison through your myjobs account.

***Lunch will be provided, but an RSVP is required for lunch!*** Please contact the alumni office at psyneuro@indiana.edu to sign up today!
Attached is the complete schedule of the day – we hope that you will join us for this wonderful celebration of the department!
PBS Advising Team